Understanding Base Points

Understanding Base Points

Understanding Base Points

Base points are used as a reference point when locating a part within a product.

All parts in Microvellum are referenced using rectangular boxes. Parts consist of 8 points and 6 faces. Faces 1 through 4 are the part’s edges and faces 5 and 6 are the part’s flat surfaces. Parts can be rotated in the X, Y, and Z axes. They can also be placed at any point in the X, Y, and Z axes. To place a part, a base point (1 - 8) will be required. In the image below, the part has a rotation of X = 0, Y = 0, and Z = 0 (0, 0, 0). This rotation shows points 2, 4, 6, and 8 on the visible (upside) face. Points 1, 3, 5, and 7 are on the nonvisible (downside) face. Also shown in the image below are the edgeband edges: Edgeband Width 1 (EBW 1) and Edgeband Length 2 (EBL 2). Edges not seen: Edgeband Width 2 (EBW 2) and Edgeband Length 1 (EBW 1). When this rotation is used, EBL 2 will reference the front of the cabinet.


Parts with a 0, 0, 0 rotation are commonly used for cabinet bottoms, tops, stretchers, and countertop decks. Base points 1, 3, 5, and 7 will locate the part from the bottom up. Base points 2, 4, 6, 8 will locate the part from the top down. For example, a cabinet bottom would use an odd number for its base point, while a top would use an even number for its base point.

The next image shows a part with a rotation of 0, -90, 0 (X, Y, Z). This rotation is commonly used for cabinet sides, and vertical divisions/partitions.


Even-numbered base points would locate the part from the left working right. Odd-numbered base points would locate the part from the right working left. For example, a left side would use an even-numbered base point, while a right side would use an odd-numbered base point.

The next image illustrates how cabinet sides, a top, and a bottom would be oriented.


The image below shows a part with a rotation of 0, -90, 90. This rotation is commonly used for cabinet backs, doors, and drawer fronts (vertical grain).


Even-numbered base points would locate the part from the front working backward. Odd-numbered base points would locate the part from the back working forward. For example, a door or a drawer front would have an odd-numbered base point so it would sit proud of the cabinet face.

The next image shows a part with a rotation of 90, 0, 0. This rotation is commonly used for drawer fronts (horizontal grain), drawer box fronts and backs, shelf edges, toe kick faces, and backsplashes.


Even-numbered base points would locate the part from the front working backward. Odd-numbered base points would locate the part from the back working forward.

The image below shows a part with a rotation of 90, 0, 90. This rotation is commonly used for drawer box sides, drawer divisions (between 2 drawers), toe kick sleepers, and end splashes.


Even-numbered base points would locate the part from the right working left. Odd-numbered base points would locate the part from the left working right. For example, a left drawer box side would use an odd-numbered base point, while a right drawer box side would use an even-numbered base point.

This next image shows the X, Y, and Z axes and how parts are typically located within the drawing environment. Notice that products extend forward in the -Y-axis. An easy way to think of this is to envision the X-axis as the face of a wall; parts located in the +Y would extend into the wall, and parts found in the -Y would extend away from the wall.



    • Related Articles

    • Understanding Machine Points

      Understanding Machine Points Machine points are used to reference the origin (X and Y axes) of machining instructions. These are not used to reference the location of the part itself – base points are used for part origin within the product. When ...
    • Understanding Machine Tokens

      Understanding Machine Tokens To view the machining tokens for a part, select the part from the parts list and click on the Machining Tab under the Parts tools. All machining operations are contained in machine tokens. There are machine tokens that ...
    • Drawing Extruded Moldings for Manufacturing

      The following article highlights the Extruded Molding Products for Manufacturing in the Foundation Library. The video below demonstartes adding the Extruded Products to Upper Cabinets. Extruded Molding Products are intended for use in manufacturing ...
    • Understanding What a Subassembly Is

      Understanding What a Subassembly Is Subassemblies are smaller products inside of another product. Subassemblies are also shared within a project. For example, the subassembly, Carcass Base, is shared across all the base cabinets in a project.  The ...
    • Understanding the Project Wizard, Global Variables, Material Files, and Door Wizard Interfaces

      This article summarizes the Project Wizard, Global Variables, Material Files, and Door Wizard Interfaces within the Library Specification Groups. For a general understanding of Library Specification Groups, see: Understanding the Library ...
    • Recent Articles

    • Toolbox Release Notes | Build 23.1.0921.641

      The following release notes apply to Toolbox build 23.1.0921.641 Cumulative Library Updates Fix Figure 1: Cumulative Update issue. There was a bug noted by users while attempting to download the Foundation Library’s phase 1 cumulative update and ...
    • Microvellum Foundation Library Release Notes | Build 23.0919

      Additions Added new product Master Double Sided Cabinet. Added “Horizontal Handles Centered” global option to all doors. This is available for all tab pulls, handles, and knobs. Added a new DRAWRECTANGLE 2D plan token to the door subassemblies. This ...
    • My Cases: Case Details

      Once you've logged into the Client Portal and navigated to the My Cases area, simply click on the case title to access the case details page. Here, you can thoroughly review the case description, append additional comments, upload attachments, and ...
    • My Cases: Overview

      Once you've logged into the Client Portal, accessing your support cases is a breeze. You can simply click on the "My Cases" icon in the flyout menu or choose the "View Cases" button conveniently placed on the Welcome page. Inside this section, you'll ...
    • Uploading Attachments to Support Cases

      Support case attachments are files or documents attached to a support case or ticket, serving the purpose of providing additional information, context, or evidence relevant to the reported issue. These attachments can encompass a wide range of file ...